WORKSHOP: MATERIAL EXPERIMENTION

I have fashioned a very simple mould from timber that will also act as a press. I will line it with baking paper to ensure the plastic doesn't stick to the timber and once the plastic is melted and up to quantity I will add the lid and press down with clamps leaving it to sit until cool. 

This was a much more successful melt, the plastic is better fused (should have had more time under heat), the plastic faces although not level (which can be solved with the addition of level blocks within the corners of the mould) are set straight with no warp and plastic colours have merged together and are making randomized patterns that look could be mistaken for intentional artwork. 

Fig 3.  Dennis, Natasha. 2017. Shredded plastic ready for melting. Photograph [author’s own}

Fig 3. Dennis, Natasha. 2017. Shredded plastic ready for melting. Photograph [author’s own}

Fig 5.  Dennis, Natasha. 2017. Un-level tile. Photograph [author’s own}

Fig 5. Dennis, Natasha. 2017. Un-level tile. Photograph [author’s own}

Fig 6.  Dennis, Natasha. 2017. Bottom side of pressed tile. Photograph [author’s own}

Fig 6. Dennis, Natasha. 2017. Bottom side of pressed tile. Photograph [author’s own}

Fig 1.  Dennis, Natasha. 2017. timber mould with baking paper lining. Photograph [author’s own}

Fig 1. Dennis, Natasha. 2017. timber mould with baking paper lining. Photograph [author’s own}

Fig 2.  Dennis, Natasha. 2017. Timber mould lid.  Photograph [author’s own}

Fig 2. Dennis, Natasha. 2017. Timber mould lid.  Photograph [author’s own}

Fig 4.  Dennis, Natasha. 2017. Melted plastic. Photograph [author’s own}

Fig 4. Dennis, Natasha. 2017. Melted plastic. Photograph [author’s own}

Fig 7.  Dennis, Natasha. 2017. Top side of pressed plastic. Photograph [author’s own}

Fig 7. Dennis, Natasha. 2017. Top side of pressed plastic. Photograph [author’s own}